Wednesday, October 26, 2011

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It Is Not Recommended To Turn Off the Computer | Using Windows Power Management At Its Best

In this article we will see why it is not recommended to turn off your PC. And also lets see various power management options. With PCs designed to work with Windows power management, including good BIOS and device implementations, users can realize great power savings and take advantage of new PC usage scenarios that weren't previously possible.

We recommend you do not turn off the computer when you have finished using it. Windows likes to perform housekeeping tasks when you aren’t using the computer, so leaving it on, even when you’re not working, is a good idea. You can schedule programs to run at specified times for example, you can schedule Windows to collect your e-mail at 7:00 every morning.

Many computers power down the monitor, hard disk, and fan after a set time of inactivity. The computer itself, however, is still running. If your screen doesn’t power off automatically, you should turn off your monitor when you aren’t using the computer.

Many computer monitors (except for LCD monitors) use the lion’s share of the electricity consumed by a computer.

Powering off unused computers at night and on weekends can save up to $60 in energy costs per machine per year! But the goals of Green IT often conflict with the needs of IT administrators to deploy critical updates.

But a good power management can help you get to a conclusion on this.

Choosing Lock Button Modes

Since Windows Vista, Windows Operating System includes Lock buttons. Lock buttons display on the Start menu and provide options for putting Windows or your computer in a different operating mode. For example, when you are ready to shut down your computer, you can use the Shut Down mode.

It Is Not Recommended To Turn Off the Computer  Using Windows Power Management At Its Best

The following list describes each mode Windows provides:

Switch User: Allows you to change from the current user to another user without shutting down the computer.

Log Off: Allows you to log off from Windows and any network connections you have established.

Lock: Allows you to lock your computer so users cannot access it, but it allows your programs to continue running. This is handy if you are downloading a large file and you need to walk away from your computer while it continues to download.

Restart: Shuts down Windows, and then reloads it (useful if your computer starts acting funny).

Sleep: Puts the computer into a sleep mode, which shuts down the hard drive and turns off the monitor to conserve power consumption. Programs remain open and your documents are automatically saved. When you awaken your computer, these devices turn back on.

Hibernate: Puts your computer into a power-saving mode that is similar to the Sleep mode. Hibernate is available only if you use the advanced power settings in Windows.

Away: Makes it appear that your computer is shut down, but some tasks like burning CDs and recording television programs still run. If you move the mouse or type on the keyboard, nothing happens.

Shut Down: Shuts down Windows. Windows displays a message when you can safely turn off the computer. Don’t turn off the computer until you see this message. Computers with advanced power management shut off automatically.

Setting Windows to Shut Down by Itself
Windows includes OnNow, technology that powers down the computer when nothing is happening and powers it back up when the computer is needed again. To use OnNow, choose Start | Control Panel, click System And Maintenance, and then run the Power Options program. To Use this feature, Your PC should have the OnNow-capable hardware.  With PCs designed to work with Windows power management, including good BIOS and device implementations, users can realize great power savings and take advantage of new PC usage scenarios that weren't previously possible.

The OnNow Power-Managed PC

Most users prefer to leave PCs turned off when not in use to reduce noise and electricity use. However, for new uses at home and in business, the PC must be instantly available to answer the phone, display e-mail, or browse the Web, but be silent and use minimal energy when not in use.

To achieve this, the OnNow-capable hardware, operating system, and applications must work together in these ways:

  • The PC appears to be off, but is ready for use immediately when the user presses the On button and return to its "off but ready" state automatically when the system is idle.
  • Software adjusts its behaviour when the PCs power state changes for example, software does not inadvertently keep the PC busy with unnecessary background tasks.
  • All devices participate in power management. Any device can have its power state changed by the system.

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Haja Peer Mohamed H, Software Engineer by profession, Author, Founder and CEO of "bench3" you can connect with me on Twitter , Facebook and also onGoogle+

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